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AVAC in the News

  • Treatment activists from ACT UP New York founded AVAC in 1995 to speed up the development of HIV vaccines. Today, AVAC also has its sights set on biomedical HIV prevention (like microbicides , PrEP and treatment as prevention), treatment for genital herpes (HSV-2) and the protective powers of male circumcision and cervical barriers. CEO Mitchell Warren is an outspoken advocate who writes regularly in the Huffington Post about the power of prevention. He was one of the first out of the gate this year to publicy tout the “we can end AIDS” beat.

    December 1, 2011
    General
    POZ
  • A curious emotional amalgam marked this year's World AIDS Day. On one hand, there is increasing confidence that many of the tools needed to halt the devastating pandemic are either available or will soon be ready. On the other, there is growing fear that the political and financial will to use those tools is failing.

    December 1, 2011
    General
    MedPage Today
  • There are growing calls to integrate HIV prevention and treatment programmes with family planning and other health services, yet a recent study has sparked concern that the two may interact in dangerous ways.

    November 30, 2011
    Financial Times
  • A leading AIDS advocacy group says while the end of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is within reach, success is far from assured. AVAC has released a science-based agenda to end the more than 30-year-old epidemic. The report has been released on the eve of World AIDS Day.

    November 29, 2011
    General
    Voice of America
  • Now is the best possible moment to invest in research, when the possibilities for long-term success are greater than ever before.  This is when we should double down on some of the amazing successes we’ve seen in the past few years. As Secretary Clinton said in her speech, it is possible to create an AIDS-free generation. Research has made this goal possible, and we must stay focused on the future.   

    November 15, 2011
    General
    The Hill
  • Advocacy groups are praising Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s comments that an AIDS-free generation is within reach. Mrs. Clinton spoke Tuesday at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Mitchell Warren called the Secretary of State’s remarks “the first step in an ambitious vision for ending the global AIDS epidemic.”

    November 8, 2011
    General
    Voice of America
  • Recent news about HIV/AIDS has focused on the good -- promising trial results that prove the antiretroviral (ARV) drugs used to treat HIV can also prevent HIV infections -- and the bad -- retreats in donor commitment that imperil the substantial gains that have been made in treating global AIDS, at the precise moment that treatment has been recognized as a powerful prevention strategy. In discussions about whether AIDS treatment can be used to end the AIDS epidemic, scant attention is paid to the search for an AIDS vaccine.

    September 29, 2011
    Huffington Post
  • A major HIV prevention trial comparing a tenofovir microbicide with two forms of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis as HIV prevention methods for women is to halt investigation of oral tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis, the Microbicide Trials Network announced on Wednesday.

    September 29, 2011
  • A study involving women at risk of HIV infection has discontinued a comparison of daily Viread (tenofovir) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to placebo, in light of expert projections that the clinical trial will not be able to demonstrate effectiveness, according to a September 28 Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) announcement. The Vaginal and Oral Interventions to Control the Epidemic (VOICE) study will, however, continue evaluating the safety and efficacy of another oral tablet, Truvada (tenofovir plus emtricitabine), along with a vaginal microbicide containing tenofovir.

    September 29, 2011
    POZ & AIDSMED
  • The Microbicide Trials Network (MTN), which is funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, today announced that it decided to stop one arm of a study involving more than 5000 women in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Uganda. The decision followed an interim review of the ongoing trial by an independent monitoring board, which found that the drug tenofovir when used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) had less effect in protecting women than anticipated.

    September 28, 2011
    ScienceInsider

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