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1 MAY 2015 VOLUME 16 ISSUE 18

Media Coverage

  • Scientists report that a new study of HIV-infected men in Uganda has identified a temporary, but potentially troublesome unintended consequence of the procedure: a possible increased risk of infecting female sexual partners while circumcision wounds heal.

    May 1, 2015
    Science Daily
  • Since the early 1980s, when HIV was first identified, our knowledge of the virus—how it causes disease, how it interacts with our immune system, how it responds to drugs—has grown year by year. Drugs specifically designed to target HIV, and given as a cocktail of different agents—known as combination antiretroviral therapy (ART)—have decreased the mortality associated with HIV infection to the point where, for newly diagnosed individuals today, life expectancies are comparable to those who are HIV-negative.

    May 1, 2015
    The Scientist
  • The US-South Africa Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research, which is worth US$40 million, with the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) each funding half the amount, announced this month (13 April) that it will support 31 joint research initiatives.

    May 1, 2015
    Sci Dev.
  • Male Circumcision has been proven to slow the spread of HIV/AIDS in Africa. But a new study shows that in the short-term the surgical technique could actually increase the risk of infection for female partners unless precautions are taken.

    May 1, 2015
    Voice of America
  • Measles is back. After declaring it eliminated in 2000, the United States is now dealing with an uptick in cases. The latest outbreak began in California’s Disneyland theme park last December and, by early April, had ballooned to 159 cases across 18 states, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This troubling situation serves as a stark reminder of the importance of immunization, which for many years had kept this once ubiquitous and sometimes deadly childhood disease in check.

    May 1, 2015
    The Scientist
  • A novel, subdermal implant delivering potent antiretroviral drugs shows extreme promise in stopping the spread of HIV, researchers report. Scientists say that they have developed a matchstick size implant, similar to a contraceptive implant, that successfully delivers a controlled, sustained release of ARV drugs up to 40 days in dogs with no adverse side effects.

    April 28, 2015
    Science Daily
  • A study by the National Coordinating Agency has sparked fears that Botswana’s gains in combating HIV/AIDS may be under threat as the country has started to record high levels of HIV prevalence rate among adolescents aged between10 and 14 years....According to a slide presentation titled “rough road: cohort-level HIV Prevalence: 2004-2013” there was a sharp increase of 6.6 percent in HIV prevalence between 2008 and 2013 among the adolescents aged between 10 and 14....There was also a sharp increase in HIV prevalence among youth aged between 15-19.

    April 28, 2015
    Sunday Standard
  • The peak time for seeking information on topics related to HIV, such as prevention and testing, is at the beginning of the week, while risky sexual behaviors tend to increase on the weekends, according to a new analysis.

    April 27, 2015
    Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • The United State government, through USAID, is giving a $20 million grant for Uganda’s reproductive health care system. According to a press statement last week, the money will improve accessibility to family planning health services. Marie Stopes International will be the implementing agency.

    April 27, 2015
    East African Business Week
  • All pregnant and breastfeeding women who test positive to HIV will now be enrolled on ART for life. This is an upgrade of the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programme, whereby pregnant women were given anti-retroviral drugs for the duration of their pregnancy. After a successful trial held in the Shiselweni region last year, the ministry of health decided to roll-out the programme throughout the country.

    April 27, 2015
    Swazi Observer
  • A small study assessing the infectiousness of HIV-positive gay men taking antiretroviral therapy has found that all study participants had an undetectable viral load in the rectum, according to a presentation at the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference last week in Brighton. Men who had rectal gonhorrea or chlamydia did not have detectable virus either, suggesting that concerns about sexually transmitted infections raising the risk of HIV transmission may be unfounded when people are taking effective HIV treatment.

    April 27, 2015
    HIV & Hepatitis
  • It’s time to pay attention to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. If signed in its current form, the TPP will lock in high, unsustainable drug prices, delay availability of less expensive generic medicines, and price millions of people out of the medical care they need....Global health programs...like PEPFAR, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria all heavily rely on the availability of price-lowering competition in medicines and vaccines to effectively run their programs.

    April 27, 2015
    The Hill
  • The World Bank Group has approved a $500 million-International Development Association credit to improve maternal, child, and nutrition health services for women and children....Program-for-Results funds will only be disbursed for independently verified improvements in key services such as vaccination coverage, rates of contraceptive use, Vitamin A supplementation, skilled birth attendance, HIV counselling and testing among women attending antenatal care, and preventing new malaria infections among children.

    April 26, 2015
    This Day
  • The Director for Gender, Labour and Social Development, Ms Jane Mpangi, said HIV has remained more prevalent among women and adolescent girls over the years despite efforts by women organisations to tackle the scourge. “Women are diverse throughout the country but there are issues that should unite us. Since 1986, it has been women tackling issues of HIV. The scourge still continues to escalate among women as years go by,” Ms Mpangi said.

    April 25, 2015
    Daily Monitor
  • Indiana public health officials defended Republican Gov. Mike Pence's decision to override a state law and set up a needle exchange program to address a severe HIV outbreak....The state legislature is debating a bill right now on whether to legalize needle exchanges.

    April 24, 2015
    Washington Examiner
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a Health Alert Network Advisory today to warn public health departments and medical providers of HIV and hepatitis C virus co-infection outbreaks resulting from IV drug use. The emergency advisory refers to the recent Indiana epidemic, where health officials identified 142 persons newly infected with HIV in a rural community of 4,200 people in Scott County. In the past, fewer than five new infections have been identified in the southeastern county annually.

    April 24, 2015
    Medical Daily
  • According to an International Labour Organisation (ILO) study [launched Friday], the number of HIV infections has declined steadily over the last decade in general terms. "Thanks to key interventions such [as] behaviour change communications, condoms, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, widespread circumcision campaigns and other preventive measures, new HIV infections have declined steadily over the last decade," Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant said.

    April 24, 2015
    South Africa Government News Agency
  • Finding that magic bullet that can keep women from getting HIV, STIs or becoming pregnant is a promising new field of research for doctors across the globe. Disappointing news from the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle about the failed trials of Tenofovir vaginal gel for HIV prevention has taken some wind from their sails.

    April 24, 2015
    EDGE
  • One-pill-a-day HIV treatments such as Atripla, Stribild, Complera, and Triumeq and Triumeq have the same rates of virological failure, drug resistance, and side effects as multiple tablet regimens, according to a meta-analysis presented to the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference this week in Brighton. Single tablets cost the UK National Health Service (NHS) 5 five times more but have unproven clinical benefits, said Andrew Hill of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital.

    April 23, 2015
    HIV & Hepatitis
  • There is a strong interest among people living with HIV in research towards an HIV cure, with many potential participants willing to consider antiretroviral treatment interruption. Respondents to a survey presented at the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference this week in Brighton generally understood that they would be unlikely to benefit personally from cure research.

    April 23, 2015
    HIV and Hepatitis

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