Email Updates

Search form

You are here

15 MAY 2015 VOLUME 16 ISSUE 20

Media Coverage

  • Is Kenya any closer now to developing a HIV vaccine than she was 15 years ago? Well, scientists working on research and development of the vaccine are giving a resounding yes, as the world prepares to mark the World AIDS Vaccine Day on monday.
    May 15, 2015
    Standard Media
  • The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the EuroVacc Foundation of Switzerland on 13 May said about 94 study participants were exposed during two trials to an investigational HIV vaccine contaminated with the bacterium Mycoplasma hyorhinis, which is known to cause disease in pigs but not in humans.

    May 15, 2015
    SCRIP Intelligence
  • A subdermal implant that delivers the HIV antiretroviral tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) has shown promise as an alternative to daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in an animal study...Researchers implanted the matchstick-size device in beagle dogs and tested its ability to deliver TAF over a 40-day period. They found high levels of tenofovir in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the first 35 days after implanting the device, levels 30 times higher than those linked with PrEP efficacy in humans.

    May 14, 2015
    AIDSmeds
  • Treatment with tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) as pre-exposure prophylaxis is associated with small but significant decreases in bone mineral density, investigators from the landmark iPrEx study report....“These results demonstrate the effect of FTC /TDF that is independent of HIV infection or other ART,” comment the authors. “The relatively small bone loss associated with FTC/TDF PrEP is offset by the prevention of HIV infection, which requires combination ART that is associated with relatively greater loss of BMD.”

    May 14, 2015
    AIDSMap
  • While the Trans-Pacific Partnership is usually described as a trade agreement, it includes provisions that have little to do with promoting international trade. One of the most important examples: provisions championed by big pharmaceutical companies that would delay introduction of low-cost, generic versions of life-saving medicines. That could have significant and potentially dangerous ramifications for global public health.

    May 14, 2015
    VOX
  • The United Nations health agency [Wednesday] reported that by the end of 2015, the world will have met the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for turning around the epidemics of HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, and boosting access to drinking water, but will likely fall short of reaching other health-related goals in areas such as child and maternal deaths and basic sanitation….

    May 14, 2015
    KFF News
  • Interest in [Burkitt's lymphoma [BL], the most common childhood cancer in Africa is building again, after several decades in which it "hibernated," said Dr. Sam M. Mbulaiteye, a senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute....New technologies that reveal the genomic and proteomic involvement in this aggressive cancer provide the potential to advance discoveries, Mbulaiteye suggested.

    May 14, 2015
    Global Health Matters
  • Sisu Global Health...is particularly interested in producing devices to support OBGYN clinics....Among its backers...are the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, USAID, UKaid, VentureWell and Better Ventures. "Evolve" is a modular centrifuge designed to support rapid diagnostic tests for HIV, malaria, hepatitis, syphilis and typhoid fever. The products are developed in-house and by a network of physicians and nurses who live in these emerging economies.

    May 14, 2015
    MedCity News
  • The Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri) has developed a new technology that will allow HIV-positive men and women to biologically bear children without infecting their HIV-negative partners....The new technologies to be rolled out by Kemri in June seek to address the desire by 'discordant' couples to have biological children.

    May 13, 2015
    Africa Review
  • Phil Berman has been working to develop an AIDS vaccine for nearly 30 years....Since his arrival at UC Santa Cruz in 2006, Berman has established a major vaccine research effort funded by a series of grants from the National Institutes of Health.... His lab has developed new vaccine candidates that he said are promising enough to consider advancing into clinical trials within the next two years.

    May 13, 2015
    Science Daily
  • A nationwide shortage of government-supplied condoms [in India] has affected two key programmes of the health ministry—HIV prevention and family planning. What compounds matters is the size of funds needed to address the shortage....Union health secretary B.P. Sharma chaired an emergency review meeting last week and one of the solutions discussed was to “divert money from other programmes to address the condom shortage”, said a senior health ministry official who did not want to be named.

    May 12, 2015
    LiveMint
  • Researchers funded by the World Bank arrived at a wildly unorthodox and unexpectedly effective strategy for preventing HIV in Lesotho: A lottery program that offered participants an opportunity to win cash on the condition that they tested negative for sexually transmitted infections. The lotteries led to a 21.4 percent reduction in HIV incidence among participants over a two-year period, and a reduction of more than 60 percent among participants identified as “risk-loving individuals”.

    May 12, 2015
    Foreign Policy
  • Male HIV patients in rural South Africa reach the low immunity levels required to become eligible for antiretroviral treatment in less than half the time it takes for immunity levels to drop to similar levels in women, according to new research from the University of Southampton. Researchers also found a link between potential proxy measures of nutritional status and disease progression....The study is the first to suggest a difference in time to a CD4 cell count of less than 350 between men and women with HIV.

    May 12, 2015
    Science Daily
  • For the second time, American universities have been ranked by how well they do global health research. This time only one — Johns Hopkins — earned a grade as high as A minus. The report cards are issued by Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, a student-led advocacy group...founded after a 2001 struggle by Yale law students to get their university and a drug company to release jointly held patent rights on an important AIDS drug.

    May 11, 2015
    New York Times
  • A simple reminder via electronic health record systems linked to significantly higher HPV vaccine completion rates, researchers say. The HPV vaccine has the lowest completion rates of any other vaccine. Researchers compared data for 6,019 patients whose clinics had prompts set up and 9,096 without prompts. Patients in the first group were significantly more likely to complete the vaccine series in a timely manner.

    May 11, 2015
    Science Daily
  • In advance of this month's World Health Assembly and the G7 summit in June, world leaders should consider the establishment of a global biomedical research and development fund and a mechanism to address the dearth in innovation for today's most pressing global health challenges, according to ...an essay published in PLOS Medicine [and] authored by an international group of leaders of public and private research institutions, non-governmental organizations, and academic groups from Europe, China, India, and South Africa.

    May 11, 2015
    Science Daily
  • The new 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, can potentially prevent 80 percent of cervical cancers in the United States, if given to all 11- or 12-year-old children before they are exposed to the virus. The study also found the 9-Valent vaccine, under the trademark of Gardasil-9, has the potential to protect against an additional 8 percent of oropharyngeal cancers,...the second-most-common HPV-associated cancer.

    May 11, 2015
    Science Daily
  • This Mother's Day, I am taking the opportunity to celebrate all mothers, but especially those who are up against some of life's biggest challenges....The risk of HIV transmission from mother to baby can be virtually eliminated with one powerful pill a day started during pregnancy, delivery in a medical facility by a skilled health professional, and treatment through the breastfeeding period but...many women face a reality in which treatment and care cannot be taken for granted.

    May 10, 2015
    Huffington Post
  • Years ago, curing AIDS was considered so out of the question that some scientists dared not even mention the possibility. But in the latest sign that attitudes are changing, GlaxoSmithKline is teaming up with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to start a research institute and a company aimed at curing HIV infection and AIDS....The company and the university will each own half of the new company, Qura Therapeutics.

    May 10, 2015
    New York Times
  • The relationship between the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Seattle-based PATH, best known for its innovative technical solutions targeting diseases of poverty, is so close that some often look to see what PATH is doing in order to judge the sometimes inscrutable intentions of the world’s biggest philanthropy. So watch out for more talk of ‘global health equity’ – the buzz phrase of the moment and the theme of PATH’s new $100 million fund-raising campaign.

    May 8, 2015
    Humanosphere
  • In the week since US president Barack Obama nominated Gayle Smith to succeed Rajiv Shah as administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), there has been jubilation, consternation and growing pressure for the Senate to confirm her appointment....Smith, 59, is a White House official and former journalist who spent 20 years in Africa covering military, economic, and political affairs for the BBC, Associated Press, and Reuters.

    May 8, 2015
    Guardian
  • In a small office at Kafue District Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, I met two HIV counselors, Albert and Philip. Their work is tough....I asked Albert why he became a lay counselor. “HIV and AIDS have completely changed our poor community,” Albert says....So Albert and Philip work to build people’s trust in the health system and make connections to those in need where they can.

    May 7, 2015
    Science Speaks

Published Research

Announcements