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22 MARCH 2019 VOLUME 20 ISSUE 11

Media Coverage

  • Antiretroviral (ARV) drugs powerfully suppress HIV and stave off disease, but in some people, treatment still allows easily detectable, low levels of virus to persist in the blood. These people do not have drug-resistant strains of HIV, nor do they appear to be skipping doses of their ARVs. A new study presented last week at an HIV/AIDS meeting in Seattle, Washington, offers an explanation to this long-standing oddity: The virus is coming from clones of infected cells.

    March 22, 2019
    Science Magazine
  • A leading charity has urged people not to panic about the effectiveness of PrEP after the seventh global case of a person contracting HIV while taking the prevention drug has been confirmed.

    March 22, 2019
    Huffington Post UK
  • A study from Peru’s capital, Lima, has found that the sexual partners of transgender women there are largely heterosexual, cisgender men who rarely have sex with other men. The study was presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019) by Dr Jessica Long of the University of Washington in Seattle.

    March 22, 2019
    General
    aidsmap
  • Researchers are demanding that healthcare providers take more of a stance on undetectable equals untransmittable (U=U) by informing HIV-positive people that they cannot transmit the virus to a sexual partner when their viral load is suppressed (or undetectable).

    March 22, 2019
    HIV Plus Mag
  • For only the second time since the start of a global epidemic, a person was reported this month to have been cured of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Scientists and activists had almost given up on reaching that milestone. Here’s a look at how we got to this point.

    March 21, 2019
    New York Times
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was supposed to usher in an end to the HIV epidemic. Now, seven years after its approval, it's clear that the once-daily pill has failed to reach the very patients who need it most.

    March 21, 2019
    The Body
  • In his State of the Union address on Feb 26, President Donald Trump called upon Congress to support a budget that would “eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within 10 years.” This is a worthy goal, and science has made great progress toward this end. However, neither money nor medication is the ultimate answer to this problem.

    March 21, 2019
    General
    Chicago Sun Times
  • The administration will focus on more than 50 “hot spots” in the U.S. that annually account for half of new HIV infections. A clinic in the Deep South sees the challenges every day.

    March 19, 2019
    General
    New York Times
  • Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Tuesday backed needle exchange programs as a way to reduce new HIV infections among people who inject illicit drugs.

    March 19, 2019
    General
    The Hill
  • HIV-positive folks who are involved in HIV networks find support, purpose, strength to combat stigma, and a better quality of life.

    March 19, 2019
    General
    HIV Plus Mag
  • In a nod to the systemic discrimination that has perpetuated the HIV epidemic among African Americans, the opening plenary also featured talks from Gina Brown, M.S.W., community engagement manager with Southern AIDS Coalition, and David Malebranche, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of medicine with the Morehouse School of Medicine.

    March 19, 2019
    General
    The BodyPro
  • San Francisco has made remarkable strides against HIV over the past half decade: New infection numbers are the lowest since the start of the epidemic. Two-thirds of people with HIV have the virus so well under control that it’s undetectable in their blood.

    March 18, 2019
    San Francisco Chronicle
  • Bette Korber had to fight intense pushback when she first proposed her idea for an HIV vaccine designed on a computer. The theoretical biologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory was trying to garner support for her “mosaic” vaccine design. Her idea was that with access to hundreds of thousands of different HIV sequences from around the world, a computational code could design synthetic proteins to fight the virus.

    March 10, 2019
    Albuquerque Journal

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