Email Updates

Search form

You are here

6 October 2017 VOLUME 18 ISSUE 40

Media Coverage

  • People with HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection are between a quarter and a third more likely to develop cardiovascular disease compared to people of a similar age with HIV mono-infection, according to results of a meta-analysis published in the Journal of Viral Hepatitis. Co-infection increased the risk of stroke by 24% and the risk of heart attack by 33%.

    October 5, 2017
    General
    aidsmap
  • The report summarizes findings from the fourth National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) data collection among persons who inject drugs (PWID). Nationally, HIV diagnoses were cut by nearly half (48%) among people who inject drugs from 2008 to 2014, according to previous CDC analyses. But emerging behavioral and demographic trends threaten recent successes. This report underscores the need for increased access to comprehensive prevention services for all PWID.

    October 5, 2017
    General
    e-HAP Direct
  • Newly named to lead the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr. Fauci came with a visual aid: A map of Africa with a single dot representing the world-changing public health threat that the emerging AIDS outbreak would become. “Every time,” he added, “in association with an emerging infectious disease.” Every time, he has added dots to the map, with lines connecting them to their names, until now dots and lines cover the map, making national boundaries nearly indistinguishable. “Some of these are trivial curiosities — a few patients,” Dr. Fauci said.

    October 5, 2017
    General
    Science Speaks
  • We know Ghanaians living with addiction face a high level of vulnerability ranging from HIV and other debilitating infections to social marginalization, crime, and years or even decades lost to finding the next high and avoiding the pain of withdrawal. People who inject drugs in the United States and elsewhere face similar risks. The difference is those in Ghana have nowhere to turn for clean needles, opioid substitution therapy, peer support, detox and rehabilitation services.

    October 4, 2017
    General
    Public Health Post
  • NIAID AIDS Division Director Carl Dieffenbach sums up hopes and setbacks of efforts to develop microbicides against HIV, products that “can be discreet and...applied by the user–important concepts for those who lack agency in relationships or face stigma for choosing to protect themselves,”--expressing continued support for “a new generation of solutions,” and asking for feedback.

    October 4, 2017
    Science Speaks
  • Our ancestors have been catching herpes since before we were human. The infection is quite common today; the WHO estimates that two-thirds of adults under 50 are infected with the herpes virus that causes oral cold sores [and] one in six have genital herpes....Yet humans might have dodged herpes' below-the-belt blow if it weren't for an ancient encounter between early members of our genus and a more distant primate relative.

    October 3, 2017
    General
    Washington Post
  • People living with HIV who experience high levels of stigma are more than twice as likely to delay enrolment into care than people who do not perceive such stigma, a United Nations report released today reveals....The report, Confronting Discrimination..., gives evidence on how stigma and discrimination is creating barriers to accessing HIV prevention, testing and treatment services and putting lives at risk. It then highlights best practices on confronting stigma and discrimination.

    October 3, 2017
    General
    UN News Centre
  • Every day the medics quietly enter villages around Kadiri town in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh and do their rounds....Behind closed doors are their "priority patients" - mostly women trafficked for sex and now battling stigma to stay on course with their HIV/AIDS treatment...."There is no choice, we have to extend our vigil beyond the walls of the hospital," said Dr Gerardo Álvarez-Uría, the hospital's director.

    October 2, 2017
    Thomson Reuters
  • Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have developed a new compound that is key to the destruction of HIV. When the compound is introduced into infected cells, viral budding (release) is suppressed, thereby confining it within the host cells. The cells then die naturally through apoptosis (cell death). It is hoped that this treatment will lead to complete recovery from AIDS in the near future.

    October 2, 2017
    Science Daily
  • Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University studying combinations of drugs against HIV have discovered why certain drugs sometimes act synergistically but sometimes do not. The paper describing their research will be published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

    October 2, 2017
    Science Daily
  • Following the lead of hundreds of HIV experts and prevention organizations around the world, the CDC this week stated there is “effectively no risk” of an HIV-positive person with an undetectable viral load — the amount of HIV in blood — sexually transmitting the virus to an HIV-negative partner. Bruce Richman, executive director of the Prevention Access Campaign’s Undetectable=Untransmittable initiative, called the CDC’s statement “remarkable”, [adding] "This is the moment we have been waiting for.”

    September 29, 2017
    General
    NBC News
  • An announcement that could mean the beginning of the end for the worldwide HIV/AIDS epidemic came this week on stage at the Global Citizen Festival. For the first time in history, a vaccine able to treat all strains of HIV is moving on to large scale human efficacy testing in humans....Paul Stoffels, Chief Scientific Officer, Johnson & Johnson,...explained that their “global vaccine, meant to protect against a variety of HIV strains,” has shown great results.

    September 29, 2017
    LGBTW Nation
  • With the annual IDWeek conference fast approaching, thousands of leading physicians and researchers will once again gather to learn about cutting-edge research on HIV prevention, treatment and cures -- and to discuss how to apply that research in ways that can directly benefit people living with HIV today.

    September 29, 2017
    BodyPro
  • A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is helping to better understand the contextual social and structural factors that drive disparate HIV/AIDS rates and how place-based interventions can be more effective in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The 22-month pilot study, recently published in the Journal of Urban Health, explored racial/ethnic and geographic differences in mode of HIV transmission in Philadelphia, an urban HIV epicenter.

    September 28, 2017
    General
    Science Daily
  • A study published in The Lancet HIV showed that while the rate of newly reported HIV cases in Europe remained steady in younger people between 2004 and 2015, it increased by 2% each year overall in older people. With around 30,000 newly diagnosed HIV infections reported each year over the last decade, the HIV epidemic remains a significant public health problem in the 31 countries of the European Union and European Economic Area.

    September 28, 2017
    General
    Science Daily
  • A few years ago, I met with doctors and scientists in Tanzania to discuss the challenge of getting more people on HIV treatment....Tom Ellman of Doctors Without Borders...shared what his organization had learned....As soon as he had finished, I thought: Far more people should be doing this. The innovation Tom described wasn’t a new technology. It was a way of simplifying HIV treatment to make it more efficient and responsive to the needs of the patients.

    September 28, 2017
    Gates Notes
  • Long-acting reversible contraceptives like IUDs are highly effective in preventing pregnancy, and their use is on the rise. But as cases of sexually transmitted diseases reach an all-time high in California, public health officials are concerned that a growing reliance on such methods is leading to declining use of condoms, which prevent STDs.

    September 28, 2017
    KPCC
  • With studies showing that African Americans living with HIV disproportionately struggle to remain in care and maintain suppressed HIV RNA levels, public health researchers will look for solutions in a new way: They will systematically and rigorously identify resources successful patients draw upon to overcome the pervasive pitfalls that hinder others.

    September 26, 2017
    News-Medical
  • Whether you are a child in Baltimore, Beijing, Nairobi or New Delhi, onset of adolescence triggers a surprisingly common set of rigidly enforced gender expectations linked to increased lifelong risks of everything from HIV and depression to violence and suicide. That’s the key finding from a groundbreaking 15-country study by the Global Early Adolescent collaboration between Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and WHO as a collection of articles in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

    September 21, 2017
    News-Medical

Published Research

  • Advances in technology—especially single-cell antibody cloning techniques—have led to the isolation and characterization of antibodies from people with HIV infection that can neutralize many variants (1). These are referred to as broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). Such antibodies can be detected in about 25% of persons with untreated HIV-1 infection (2), reflecting a host immune response to unremitting viral replication, generation of large numbers of viral variants, and shifting antigen exposure (3).

    October 6, 2017
    Antibody Related Research
    Science
  • Between Sept 12, 2011, and Oct 3, 2012, 191 women were enrolled to the trial. 178 (93%) completed directly observed dosing and were randomly assigned one of the three PrEP regimens for the self-administered phase....Daily PrEP dosing resulted in higher coverage of sex events, increased adherence to the regimen, and augmented drug concentrations than did either time-driven or event-driven dosing. These findings support recommendations for daily use of PrEP with oral emtricitabine plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in women.

    October 3, 2017
    Lancet HIV
  • In Lancet HIV, Bekker and colleagues report findings of an open-label randomised trial of oral PrEP (HPTN 067/ADAPT)...[in which] HIV-negative women were randomly allocated oral PrEP… self-administered as one of three regimens...ADAPT showed many women interested in oral PrEP when offered with information about expected safety and efficacy...., [which] accords with results of trials in men who have sex with men...and a major step forward in HIV prevention in women. With respect to best dosing strategy, ADAPT findings are less clear.

    October 3, 2017
    Lancet HIV
  • Policymakers should recognize that not all cost-effective interventions are affordable and interpret information about cost-effectiveness in the context of their budget and other available funding sources. Both cost-effectiveness and affordability should be reflected in the design of essential health service packages.

    October 2, 2017
    General
    PLoS Med
  • Rosenberg heads the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM), a non-profit organisation that is developing a microbicide eluting vaginal ring shown to prevent HIV infection in women....Rosenberg started working on microbicides while at the NIH in 1994. Pressure from activists encouraged scientists like her to start working on methods for preventing HIV infection in women. “The focus then was on MSM but...we realised that women were going to bear the brunt of the AIDS epidemic,” she [said].

    October 2, 2017
    BMJ
  • 945 women aged 18–23 years in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, who were HIV uninfected and sexually active consented to HIV-1 RNA testing twice a week and biological sampling and risk assessment every 3 months during participation in a 48–96 week life-skills and job-readiness programme....Results: Frequent HIV screening combined with a socioeconomic intervention facilitated sampling and risk assessment before and after infection [and]...we established a cohort optimised for prevention and cure research.

    October 1, 2017
    Lancet HIV
  • Krista Dong and colleagues successfully established a prospective cohort of high-risk young women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa...to study acute HIV infection....Socioeconomic interventions...were scheduled to coincide with the frequency and duration of study visits for sample collection....The authors showed significant benefits for immediate ART and in prevention of seroconversion....and [the importance of a] non-monetary, effective, and sustainable socioeconomic intervention targeting the needs of this population to encourage participant adherence.

    October 1, 2017
    General
    Lancet HIV
  • The researchers determined that despite an ever-growing body of information on adolescent reproductive health, poor communication at home is contributing to a dearth of basic sexual health knowledge that could prevent HIV/AIDS, unwanted pregnancies and abortion. The problem is exacerbated by adolescents’ ever-growing reliance on mass media to learn about sex.

    June 10, 2017
    General
    J Public Health in Africa

Announcements