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24 November 2017 VOLUME 18 ISSUE 47

Media Coverage

  • The world's first two-drug regimen to treat HIV has won US approval in a boost for the treatment's majority owner GSK. Medicines regulator the US Food and Drug Administration has given the green light to a once-daily pill combining two previously approved drugs: dolutegravir and rilpivirine. HIV patients currently combine three or four medicines to suppress the virus. It is hoped the new treatment, called Juluca, will be less burdensome and reduce side effects.

    November 22, 2017
    The Telegraph
  • As the World AIDS Day is approaching on December 1, Doctors without Borders (MSF) on Monday called for greater efforts to reduce high HIV/AIDS mortality rate in South Africa.

    November 21, 2017
    Xinhua
  • An Israeli company pioneered a device called PrePex that is making mass circumcision easier than ever. PrePex has proved practical for low-resource settings and large-scale rollout.

    November 21, 2017
    New Times
  • South Africans need to determine what values we want, said South African scientist Professor Quarraisha Abdool Karim shortly after being appointed UNAIDS Special Ambassador for Adolescents and HIV.

    November 21, 2017
    General
    Health-e News
  • Associate Scientific Director of the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (Caprisa) Professor Quarraisha Abdool Karim has been appointed UNAIDS Special Ambassador for Adolescents and HIV.

    November 20, 2017
    General
    IOL
  • For the first time ever, Beijing residents can get themselves checked for HIV anonymously by purchasing an HIV self-testing kit without providing any personal information whatsoever. The self-testing kits are available for purchase from vending machines located at 11 universities in Haidian. In addition to its advantageous lack of purchase restrictions, the self-testing kits also boast of being a non-invasive procedure.

    November 20, 2017
    General
    The Beijinger
  • Only 1.5 per cent of newborns in Rwanda tested HIV positive this year down from two per cent in 2016 — an achievement the country hopes to sustain in the fight against the killer virus.

    November 19, 2017
    General
    The East African
  • In an attempt to eradicate Tuberculosis (TB) by 2030, delegates from 114 countries have agreed to take urgent action to end the world's deadliest disease. The announcement came at the first WHO global ministerial conference in Moscow on ending tuberculosis.

    November 18, 2017
    General
    Economic Times
  • Counties across America are offering the poor and uninsured a drug that can stop the spread of HIV. But in Mecklenburg County, which has one of the highest HIV infection rates in the nation, the people most at risk still can’t get the drug more than five months after county commissioners agreed to pay to expand its use.

    November 17, 2017
    Charlotte Observer
  • A booster shot of an experimental HIV vaccine given four years after the first round of three shots prompted a significant immune response in HIV-negative study participants, Reuters Health reports. Publishing their findings in PLOS ONE, Spanish researchers from the RISVAC02boost study examined the effects of the booster shot.

    November 17, 2017
    POZ
  • “Getting to Zero” is an ambitious campaign under way in San Francisco to eliminate new HIV infections by 2020. The plan includes increasing the use of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis, a daily pill to prevent getting HIV) along with identifying people who have HIV early and getting them into treatment.

    November 17, 2017
    POZ
  • Last year, Londoners tested for HIV more than, and also more frequently than, anywhere else in the country, which resulted in a significant drop in HIV diagnoses in the capital.

    November 16, 2017
    General
    Evening Standard
  • Sexual transmission is the main method of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in women. The effectiveness of topical microbicides for HIV-1 prevention can be inconsistent and insufficient, which are associated with low adherence rates and/or product misuse. To address these difficulties, researchers presenting at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition designed extended release vaginal films which could be effective in HIV prevention for up to seven days.

    November 15, 2017
    Medical Xpress

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