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Treatment

To save lives, HIV treatment alone isn’t enough. Suppressing HIV is what matters.

In 2011, a landmark clinical trial showed that early initiation of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for people who are HIV-infected cuts the risk of HIV transmission by a stunning 96 percent. The trial provided powerful new momentum to global efforts to expand treatment access — both for the health of individuals living with HIV and for the potential to prevent millions of new infections.

Getting people onto treatment, though, is only half the story. To save lives and slow the HIV epidemic, treatment needs to achieve long-term virologic suppression — meaning the level of HIV in a person’s body is essentially undetectable. In most countries, only a minority of people with HIV have their virus in check. To make viral suppression the norm, better adherence programs, viral load monitoring and other steps are urgently needed.

What We're Reading

Scientists have identified compounds that inhibit the reactivation of cells that are latently infected with HIV, meaning they are not replicating and producing new copies of the virus.

December 12, 2018
POZ

The Trump administration has thrown into doubt a multimillion-dollar research contract to test new treatments for HIV that relies on fetal tissue — work targeted by antiabortion lawmakers and social conservatives aligned with the president.

December 4, 2018
Cure, General, Treatment
Washington Post

Two-thirds of people taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) would be interested in switching to a once-weekly oral regimen should it become available, according to American research published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases. Opinion was evenly split on switching to injectable therapy but treatment delivered using implants attracted relatively little interest.

October 15, 2018
aidsmap
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